"Asking Questions, Looking For Answers" - Same Thing? - NoScheduleMan.com

“Asking Questions, Looking For Answers” – Same Thing?

Kevin Bulmer Video Blog: Seeking Answers, Asking Questions - Same Thing?It occurs to me I’ve spent much (most?) of my life up until now looking for answers.

Solutions.

Fixes.

All of a sudden, I’ve realized I’m much better off by asking questions instead.

But aren’t they the same things? Asking questions and looking for answers?

In many cases, I don’t think they are. And that’s what I set out to explore and share here. I’d love your thoughts and experience with this. Please leave them in the comments section under the video, below.

Now, if you’re interested in this but would rather read than watch, here’s the video transcript:

I’ve got a question for you. Here it is: Is looking for answers or a solution the same as asking questions? I’ve come around to thinking in some cases, I don’t think it is. It seems redundant when you first say that. Is looking for an answer, a solution, the same as asking questions? Let me give you the context that I’m asking that with.

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The last 10 days or so, I’ve just felt generally lousy, just this malaise, foggy head, achy body, a little bit of congestion. My voice isn’t where it’s supposed to be, just have no energy, and I’m wondering what in the world is going on. There are a lot of things that I do, or specifically don’t do, to try to keep a situation like this from happening, or to keep it from when it does happen from lasting anymore than 24 hours or so. But a week to 10 days? Come on.

There’s the checklist of stuff, daily meditation, affirmations, getting your mindset right, reading positive material, getting exercise, drinking a couple liters of water, eating a decent diet, all of those things. I do all those things, and yet still ended up in this situation where I just felt awful for about 10 days and didn’t even want to do the things that I wanted to do, let alone the things I didn’t.

It’s the difference between just trying to mask or numb the pain and actually beginning to heal.

How does that relate to looking for answers and asking questions? I noticed that my default mode when I got not feeling well was to look for a solution, a fix, a trigger, a button, something that I could push, some switch that I could flip, to take this situation that I don’t like and make it right, to make the discomfort go away, to fix it. I’m looking for an answer, I’m looking for some kind of a solution. But after a couple of days of that, trying to think of some pill I could take, or is the answer to just lay in bed for a day or two, looking for a solution.

After a little bit of that, my mindset changed. My perspective shifted, thinking, “This isn’t working really well for me.” That’s when I started asking questions. I thought, “However I am now is the culmination of a lot of little things from all the time leading up to now, good or bad, things I’m doing or things I’m not doing. I wonder what they are? I wonder what things I should be doing more of, less of, and how I can change from this point going forward to give myself an even better chance and not landing in this spot again, or at least in this spot for this amount of time again?”

As I began to ask more questions and really get honest with myself, it started to reveal some different habits and to some different thoughts that have given me some areas that I think I can investigate to make things better for myself going forward. In that context, it occurs to me that asking questions of yourself seems fundamentally different than looking for an answer or a solution. I mean a big difference, the difference between just trying to mask or numb the pain and actually beginning to heal.

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Comments: Is Looking For Answers The Same As Asking Questions?

What do you think? Please add your thoughts to the Comments Section, below. I’d love to hear from you.

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